The Great Barrier Reef is home to one of the world’s most diverse ecosystems. Across its 2,300 kilometre reach, there are 2,500 individual reefs, over 9,000 species of fish, whales, and turtles, among other creatures. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, and one of the world’s seven natural wonders, the Great Barrier Reef attracts over two million visitors every year to explore its colourful corals and unique marine life. Yet for all its wonder, the reef’s coral has rapidly deteriorated as ocean temperatures continue to rise. When water temperatures rise, algae and corals separate, resulting in corals being stressed and stripped of their colour — this is known as coral bleaching. The coral bleaching events inflicted on the reef are well documented, with half of the coral on the reef already dead.  While coral populations can recover from a bleaching event, the road to recovery is often a decade-long process. If carbon emissions remain steady, UNESCO climate models predict coral bleaching will occur twice every decade from 2035 onward, and annually after 2044.  Finding ways to solve this environmental catastrophe has been difficult, but with concerted efforts, there h...