Elizabeth Vianna, winemaker and general manager of Chimney Rock Winery in Napa, Calif., said she hopes the 2017 wildfires — which burned the hills in the background — are a “100-year occurrence.” Marc Heller/ E&E News NAPA, Calif. — The wildfires that lit the hills around John Williams’ winery two years ago changed the way he and many Napa Valley growers view climate change and gave birth to a new area of research into “smoke taint” in wine. “That whole hillside and that whole hillside were aflame,” Williams said, his arms outstretched, in his vineyard, called Frog’s Leap Winery, one afternoon this week. “I hope it was a little bit of a wake-up call that something is going on.” When fires raged across Northern California in October 2017, in addition to destroying lives and livelihoods, they also imprinted a smoky scent on some grapes that was reflected in the vintage of wine that followed. Now agricultural researchers have a new climate-related impact to study: how to get the smoky taste out of the wine without affecting the rest of the flavor. The Napa Valley is like the bottom of a long, narrow bowl t...