Connecticut’s once state-of-the-art recycling system is in disarray, the victim of a worldwide collapse in markets for material, compounded by a slow-footed General Assembly and some who are confused about what to throw into their curbside containers, experts say. Over the last two years, recyclables including glass, cans, cardboard, mixed paper and plastics have gone from moneymakers for towns and cities that collect them in separate containers in the single-stream program, to cost centers that are pushing into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Glass in particular is a problem when it gets crushed in recycling compacter trucks and contaminates clean cardboard, one of the few materials for which a solid resale market still exists. Recycling professionals say that state lawmakers missed a great opportunity this year when they allowed lobbyists in the State Capitol to kill legislation that would have doubled the nickel deposit on cans and bottles of carbonated beverages and expanded the 40-year-old program to include bottles of wine and spirits such as whiskey snd vodka. Now, after China’s refusal to accept the recyclables from the United States and other countries, it costs m...