The food retailer, which installed the first transcritical CO2 system in a U.S. supermarket, is now

The food retailer, which installed the first transcritical CO2 system in a U.S. supermarket, is now deploying one of the first in a U.S. retail warehouse. Hannaford, a Scarborough, Maine (U.S.)-based diviion of Ahold Delhaize, has the distinction of installing the first transcritical CO2 booster refrigeration in a U.S. supermarket, at a store in Turner, Maine, in July 2013. Now, Hannaford is about to become one of the first U.S. grocers to employ a transcritical CO2 system in a refrigerated warehouse. (The first known to do so was Angelo Caputo’s Fresh Markets, which installed a transcritical system at a warehouse/commissary in Carol Stream, Illinois, U.S., also in July 2013; a store was later added to that facility; see “In Love with CO2,” Accelerate America, June 2015.) Hannaford’s CO2 warehouse, located in Shodack Landing, New York (U.S.) – 20 miles east of Albany, New York – also contains one of the world’s largest refrigerated spaces (250,000ft2/23,226m2) to use a transcritical system, supplied by Quebec, Canada- based Carnot Refrigeration. The warehouse supplies 85 of Hannaford’s approximately 190 stores in New York, New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts. Harrison Horni...

John Tomczyk is HVACR professor emeritus, Ferris State University, Big Rapids, Michigan, and coauthor of Refrigeration

John Tomczyk is HVACR professor emeritus, Ferris State University, Big Rapids, Michigan, and coauthor of Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Technology, published by Cengage Learning. Contact him at tomczykjohn@gmail.com. Sponsored Content is a special paid section where industry companies provide high quality, objective, non-commercial content around topics of interest to the ACHR News audience. All Sponsored Content is supplied by the advertising company. Interested in participating in our Sponsored Content section? Contact your local rep. On Demand Refrigerant Safety Classes A2L and A3 have a very low GWP, making them a strong, long-term solution for many HVACR applications. However, these refrigerants are classified as mildly flammable and highly flammable respectively. This flammability class raises safety and compliance concerns. This webinar will help you understand these classes, along with the opportunities these refrigerants can offer. In this issue of The NEWS, we focus on rooftops and air handlers. We also examine the impact of health care on HVAC contractors and take a look at duct system performance. Closed Cooling Tower, Heat Exchanger, Air Source Heat Pump R...